Traditional relational databases — ironically — are not that good at the complex relationships some modern applications need.

Multiple joins and complex sub-queries can gradually take a toll on performance.

Graph Databases, on the other hand, are all about relationships. In this talk we will look at using the popular Neo4j graph database with PHP to build efficient relational data for OmNomHub: not your average recipe site.

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Rated 5

Tom Lovelady at 14:49 on 13 Apr 2019

Really nice introduction to neo4j, everything was explained and there was even a roll of the dice with a live demo (that worked flawlessly)

Rated 4

M1ke at 16:41 on 13 Apr 2019

Interesting talk presented with enthusiasm and helpful live demos. Good to include the examples of the Doctrine-style repository code. The question at the end to ask people for their own suggestions was good - it might be positive to have a few usage ideas to go over in more detail if people aren't that talkative

Rated 5

Mark Taylor at 11:59 on 14 Apr 2019

I enjoyed your talk, and it's inspired me to have a play with Neo4J. The demo was particularly useful, it's always nice to back up words with some examples I think to help things soak in.

Loved the talk. I have recently became interested in Neo4j so this talk has helped put some of my questions into perspective.

It would be interesting to see if there is actually an application to migrate a SQL database over to Neo4j. Although if not it should be fairly easy to create (but might need cleaning (for example primary keys etc.

Rated 5

Shaun Walker at 09:25 on 15 Apr 2019

This talk was a really fun and enlightening talk.

I had played around with a graph database a while ago as I really love the idea of them. But never carried on/got to build in production.

This was great to see either as a refresher but even if you've never looked at graph databases before. And I discovered theres an OGM which I didnt realise existed :D