PSR-18 defines how to send PSR-7 requests without binding your code to a specific client implementation. This is particularly interesting for reusable libraries that need to send HTTP requests but don’t care about specific client implementations.

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Intresting to discover psr 17 & 18, but hopping the presentation to be a bit more dynamics. But it was intresting to discover it and see there is already some lib that implements it

I'm guessing this is mostly because of the subject, but I felt the talk was a bit "dry". It could use some spicing up. Having said that, some great info in this talk and the practical implementation part on promises was definitely interesting.

I had no clue about PSR-18 (or PSR-7 or PSR-17), but now I am enlightened :-) And in the margin of this talk, I learned about php promises. This was probably the talk in which I learned the most these two days.

Rated 3

Koen Cornelis at 14:43 on 27 Jan 2019

I entered a tad late to this one, but the part i saw i found confusing. Too dry, with code examples that didn't make sense to me in the short time i had to look at them. It seemed as though at least two of the promise examples were implemented in a blocking way rather than async. Given that the slides aren't here yet i can't check those examples.

A coherent story was definitely missing from this one.

David Buchmann (Speaker) at 16:24 on 27 Jan 2019

@koen cornelis: I only got assigned the talk on joind.in now. i added the link to the slides. there are 2 loops, one to fire off the async requests, a second to wait for them to resolve. but if i messed it up, please tell me so i can fix that for future presentations.

I had no idea about PSR-18 before I went into this talk, and I walked out with all the information I needed to start using it immediately. Great talk, thank you!

Rated 4

Ike Devolder at 20:50 on 30 Jan 2019

Super interesting topic, how a (part of) implementation became a new standard in our PHP world. In general I felt the presentation was more about PHPlug and how a part of it became PSR-18, than being really about PSR-18.