“The Mythical Man-Month” is one of the seminal books in the field of software project management. It was written in 1975, based on experience from the 1960s. Is it even still relevant? Turns out, it is. Technology may have changed dramatically but people have not. Managing software projects is about managing people, not bits, and creative people engaged in intellectual endeavors are notoriously hard to predict and manage. (Just ask my project manager.) Fortunately, many of the lessons-learned Brooks’ presents are still relevant today. Some are directly applicable (“adding people to a late project makes it later”) while others are valid with a little interpretation. Still others fly in the face of conventional wisdom. What can we learn from that? This session will present a modern overview of the ideas presented by Brooks and a look at what we can still learn from them even today.

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Many interesting insights, especially from an organising / management perspective. Thanks for the keynote.

This is the typical talk you wish your managers attended. Brilliant.

Rated 5

Samuele Lilli at 14:55 on 11 May 2019

A great talk suitable both for developers and managers.
Great way to kick off the last day of this conference.

“What can we learn from this?”

The way you make people think on our own by asking that question without an answer several times in the talk and then end with the same question is amazing.

I saw this talk before, it made me think back then and it made me think now. About communication, MVPs, architects... All these things we all need but often struggle with. These lessons should not be new to us but somehow we keep repeating our own mistakes. Having talks like this helps a lot with that.

The way you presented in a clear way and the stories that you had were just great. I’d not change a thing.

This is the second time I see this talk, is it still as great? Yup!

What can we learn from this?

It is important to know that you are on the right path to solve problems, but the Problem is being able to be followed!