A long time ago, in a land far away, lived a software wizard that was capable of grand magic.
They built gardens, libraries, temples, castles. They created life where there wasn’t,and cleared the path where it was unsafe. And then they disappeared, and even though they left
behind books and notes, none of their apprentices were able to learn the craft. Since then,nobody was able to use any of the tools of the great mage, and the creations kept working for
only a few years, when finally even the last stone that was placed crumbled into sand.
Sounds familiar? Software often feels the same: we’re all magicians that force a piece of
sand into semi-rational thought, but what will happen when everyone moves on, and nothing
works as expected anymore? This talk explores the problems that arise from breaking compatibility
with existing tools, how to prevent those breakages from happening, and what to look for as a
software maintainer. While I cannot guarantee that you will build indestructible magical
fortresses with my tips, I can at least help you make sure that your work will live on with
other people picking it up, and hopefully appreciating the stability that you worked towards.

Comments

Please login to leave a comment

Anonymous at 12:11 on 26 Sep 2019

Lively Presentation. Stunning introductory example.
But there was not much in actual content.

Timon F at 12:40 on 26 Sep 2019

Interactive presentation with interesting knowledge about backward compatibility breaks.

And I learned POOP 💩

I'm totally a fan of Marco's presenting style :+1:

Really great talk! Many points not everyone knows about Backwards Compatibility.

Very good talk. I like the quiz. :)

Very entertaining presentation.

Ole Rößner at 19:49 on 27 Sep 2019

I like Marcos talks but there where better ones. Nevertheless it raised awareness on this topic!

SL19 at 19:58 on 27 Sep 2019

Hat aufgezeigt wie viel BCs man doch gelegentlich nicht direkt auf dem Schirm hat.

hans.peter at 21:36 on 27 Sep 2019

nice talk.

Martin Bens at 17:34 on 28 Sep 2019

The Talk was a nice introduction on how to avoid bc-breaks in theory and examples.

nice slides + quiz with good examples

Thomas Sliwa at 09:51 on 30 Sep 2019

Not much to say, except that the talk shows problems way beyond the daily business. Keep your mind in think and implication mode on every sinle property change...

No more to say.