Integrating Communities

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Fantastic talk on community integration, some great points that should be taken to heart. Let's start listening to the next generation of developers and start fixing what is wrong.

Thank you.

Rated 5

Liam Wiltshire at 09:51 on 20 Feb 2015

Hands down the most passionate, inspiring keynote I've seen in a long time!

Rated 4

Anonymous at 09:51 on 20 Feb 2015

A passionate talk on the importance of communities and basically being nice to each other!

Parts rang true for me: I'm at my second PHP conference on my own and where I know no one. Everyone is friendly but it still feels completely like I am on the outside of the circle. Thanks Jenny!

A great talk. Inspiring to think about how we act as people in our community. Anything to help people get on and help each other is a good thing.

Truly a keynote delivered straight from the heart. Passionate delivery of content relevant to anyone and everyone in the room.

Good intentions and a great passionate talk.

However, I think in a future talk Jenny might want to be a bit less prescriptive. Instead of saying "do this", "don't do that", it might be better to try "if you do this, [insert not so great outcome] happens; if you do this instead you will get [insert happy outcome]". Contrast with yesterday's morning keynote by the admittedly more experienced Yitzchok.

Anyway, thanks for the talk. :)

Nice slides. Touching. Very well practised.

Rated 1

Anonymous at 11:33 on 20 Feb 2015

Felt a little preachy... sorry :/

Very enjoyable talk passion was obvious

Very passionate presentation. Clearly all came from the heart.

Hear hear. It is hard being at a conference on your own, especially if you're not a big extrovert.

Need a conference buddy system.

Excellent keynote that made me think a lot about how I treat software development communities.

Awesome - this captured your passion for community perfectly, and some great pieces of advice there.

Thanks for this insightful and inspiring talk. I bemoan the lack of diversity sometimes and this was definitely food for thought. :)

I'm sorry, but I did not like it at all. Compared to Yitz this felt like a teenager crying how hard her real life is. What was the point in that?

A hard one to rate because the speaker seemed like a really good human being and it's obvious that communities are a valuable thing that we could all take less for granted. But a nice speaker and a worthy topic don't necessarily make for an incendiary keynote on their own. Still I expect great future things from a young and clearly passionate coder.

Jenny clearly cares a great deal about bringing communities together and it's a commendable topic. Though I felt the points were laboured to the state where I felt we were almost being told off. Not the motivational vibe I was hoping for.

Very well presented, very good content. Love to see more ;)

good talk on some important points. felt like some of it got repititve at times... was like being back at school.

all her points needed to be said though. very brave for standing up there and saying it.

This one struck a chord with me. First I realise that a perspective of tolerance, understanding and ultimately celebration of diversity is best conveyed by having it come from the voice of speakers like Jenny, who has first hand experience in integrating diversity. Also, as a enthusiast about Communities of Practice, I've been given some ideas in this keynote that I can apply in nourishing and integrating my organisation inner communities with the wider world.

Solid keynote - enjoyed her enthusiastic style.

Jenny's passion for communities and bringing people together shone through this measured and well-presented keynote - she treated some quite emotive subjects with sensitivity. I was incredibly impressed at her performance having had relatively little experience and time in our industry.

An interesting talk, a new take on an age old problem

Clearly a topic that matters a great deal to Jenny, and that came through in a very impassioned delivery

This topic matters a lot to Jenny, it shows how passionate she is when she delivers it. The ideas she had on us working together to make this community better, brick by brick building bridges really came trough well. A very confident spot on delivery, presentation was flawless and left many of us thinking about how we treat "The other PHP communities", something that many don't even realise. Well done!

Jenny was enthusiastic and clearly in touch with the community, however by the end of the talk I felt like a scolded child. A bit deflating for a keynote. Sorry :S

As some of the other comments said, Jenny is obviously passionate about the topic and made some good points, but - and I'm really sorry to say this - I felt "told off" and the points were over-laboured to the point I thought it was very condescending. I know there are points that needed to be made, but rather (than for example the closing keynote) than making us feel enabled to make a change it felt quite deflating.

My point is, that I understand the battles, but we still need debates, so take that passion and belief and tell people wordpress is good rather than tell us off for dissing it (I incidentally like Wordpress!); I mean as PHP devs we are mocked frequently but the "real" languages, but we stand strong and fight our corner but at the same time, we do laugh at ourselves.

The talk was well delivered and Jenny is plainly a confident speaker. But as others have alluded to it felt like a telling off. I guess I'm 'lucky' to fall in to a category of delegate that doesn't ever suffer from discrimination, though. I'm not saying that these topics don't need to be discussed - and to be honest my three thumb rating probably reflects my feeling toward the fact that this type of talk has to exist at all (I really wish that everyone were decent human beings and didn't need this type of talk), rather than a reflection ont he delivery of the talk. Personally, I would've preferred a more positive opening talk to the day.

As some of the other comments have mentioned some of the tone of the talk veered into a telling off which isn't ideal for a keynote with such a positive message.

Such strict do's and don'ts are likely to turn people off which would be a real shame when we want people to work together.

I get what you were saying so I'm sorry to be so harsh.

Sorry

Inspiring talk. Quite personal at times, but there were still things to take away from it, like getting involved in a local user group. Good presentation style.

Rated 5

Anonymous at 10:59 on 24 Feb 2015

Nice slides, good pace, nice feel to it all. Friendly and informative. - MK

An impassioned delivery of an important message. Suitably "preachy" at times - I suspect some of use need a bit of telling-off about how we occasionally malign one another. However, it was a bit repetitive; the same message said several ways began to grate a little after a while.

I really enjoyed the keynote. With passion, conviction, and much, much, enthusiasm, Jenny communicated why it's essential to not stay just in your own community, but to be a part of so many others, to be inclusive, to be ever considerate, no matter where you are, what you know, or what you do. Well done!

I saw Jenny give this talk at my local user group and her passion and spirit for bringing communities together is fantastic to see. Her talk is important and it is a difficult one to give without sounding like you are telling people off or preaching, but I think the energy she puts in really helps with this and she is brave for saying what has been needed to be said.

I think she could improve the talk by providing more a few examples of ways we can help achieve her goals, though that is easier said than done. Hopefully she will inspire a variety of talks with solutions to these issues.

Jenny surely is passionate about the community, but the tone and the content were in my opinion not suiting the keynote. The first part, the history of Jenny's life, was unneeded, and some of the presented situations (like apparent hate of PHP community towards Wordpress community) IMO were misguided.