OggCamp is an unconference focussed on "open" things: open source software, open hardware, open culture ... you get the idea. We'll have some talks scheduled in advance but most of the schedule comes from the attendees who show up, propose talks, and make the event what it is.

Friday 18th October 2019

19:00
0
Pre-Event Warmup Social in the Garden Bar in Main Track (3 hour)

We'll be in the bar at the venue, with a special deal on a simple menu and generally solving the problems of the world. Check the blog post for more details: https://oggcamp.org/news/social-events/

Saturday 19th October 2019

10:30
0
Welcome in Main Track (25 minutes)

Come and find out what's going on today at OggCamp! This is intros, inspiration and orientation. It's worth your time.

11:00
0
We built a crowd-sourced open data site!
Talk by Elizabeth Eden, Terence Eden in Main Track (25 minutes)

Spoiler Alert - one day, you’re going to die. You may not get a blue plaque, but perhaps you’ll get a memorial bench. Liz & Terence have built openbenches.org where anyone can add to a collection of open data. We’ll show you why & how we built this collection of >12000 benches from around the world.

11:30
0
The Progress of MQTT
Talk by Andy Stanford-Clark, Roger Light in Main Track (55 minutes)

Back in 2009, at OggCamp01 (before we got the numbering convention sorted out), I gave the opening keynote about Internet of Things and the MQTT messaging protocol that underpins all the cool things I’d been doing to automate my home, save energy in a number of ways, and make the Isle of Wight ferries tweet about their movements. Roger Light was in the audience and was sufficiently inspired by my talk to rush home and create the mosquitto project on launchpad. The rest, as they say, is history, and 10 years later, at OggCamp19, I will give edited highlights of the tremendous impact MQTT has made in the world of Internet of Things in the last ten years, which has been considerably helped by the widespread adoption of mosquitto as the first open source MQTT message broker. I will also talk about some of my recent IoT projects, including animatronic dinosaurs, more ferry-related stuff, and keeping antelopes warm in their beds in the winter!

12:30
0
Lunch in Main Track (55 minutes)

Taking a break on the main stage, but food isn't provided so you need to find it yourselves

13:30
0
Lightning Talks in Main Track (25 minutes)

Five talk slots, five minutes per talk. Slots are first-come, first-served!

14:00
0
Noobs on Ubs
Talk by Anna in Main Track (25 minutes)

I started out as a total noob using Ubuntu, copying and pasting from stack overflow in wild abandon to install whatever I needed without a care in the world. A few chmod 777s later - I actually learnt what that does (spoilers - it’s not always the answer) and decided I should maybe learn how my OS works. In this talk, I’ll be explaining how Linux works and sharing my story as a beginner. This talk is for you if you’re a beginner/hobbyist/Linux-lite user and looking to feel less alone in the world.

14:30
0
Video Killed My Data Plan: Delivering video that doesn't break the bank
Talk by Doug Sillars in Main Track (25 minutes)

Video is one of the fastest growing mediums on the web and in mobile applications. Video files have been shown to increase engagement, and can be a great way to deliver your message quickly. (And who doesn’t love animated GIFs?) However, video that takes a long time to start up leads to frustration and abandonment. The same goes for video that stalls during playback. In this talk, you’ll learn best practices to optimize the delivery of your video to you customers, ensuring fast delivery and minimizing stalls for a great customer experience.

15:00
0
Making Free Productivity Software Sustainable
Talk by Simon Phipps in Main Track (25 minutes)

Productivity software like LibreOffice has long been sustained by the commercial activities of community members as well as the contributions of countless volunteers. That's also driven standards engagement, like the work around ODF. But the cloud is slowly killing the desktop support business, and volunteers aren't enough for complex, mature software. TDF has been innovating to sustain LibreOffice and ODF. This talk will describe the COSM and TDC projects which are sustaining LibreOffice, ans ask whether similar approaches might sustain other open source desktop software.

15:30
0
Confronting the AdTech Leviathan
Talk by Mike Morel in Main Track (25 minutes)

Advertising technology (AdTech) systems broadcast the public’s personal data to thousands of companies who use it to track users across the internet and build sophisticated profiles. After being declared unlawful under the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), a reckoning is coming. Learn how the shadowy AdTech ecosystem works and how its abuses are being exposed and challenged.

16:00
0
Panel session in Main Track (55 minutes)

We've got great guests and you can submit your own questions. All the info here: https://oggcamp.org/panel/

19:00
0
PARTY! in Main Track (3 hour)

With drinks in the bar, hallway track in the exhibition space and a band on the main stage, there's something for everyone at OggCamp Saturday Night. More information in our blog post: https://oggcamp.org/news/social-events/

Sunday 20th October 2019

10:30
0
Welcome in Main Track (25 minutes)

Come and find out what's going on today at OggCamp! This is intros, inspiration and orientation. It's worth your time.

11:00
0
Collecting badges with parkrun: The tale of the running-challenges browser extension
Talk by Dr Laura Cowen, Andy Taylor in Main Track (25 minutes)

Last year, we added a new dimension of fun to Saturday morning 5k parkruns with virtual badges in a browser extension. Suddenly it became ‘a thing’ with 10,000 users across the world. We’ll talk about how it all started, how and why we develop the extension for both Firefox and Chrome, our ethos, what data we have available and its limitations, and managing the requests and high expectations of the parkrun community.

0
This DoS goes loop-di-loop - preventing DoS attacks in you Node.js application
Talk by Allon Mureinik in FlawCon Track (25 minutes)

Node.js’ single-threaded nature makes it very susceptible to DOS attacks. While Node.js’ event loop allows performing some operations in an asynchronous fashion, it’s still quite easy to write a vulnerable Node.js application by making a few simple mistakes. In this talk I’ll cover some common ways a Node.js application may be vulnerable to DoS attacks and some common best-practices and counter measures to defend against such attacks.

11:30
0
Running an open source project with (almost) no community
Talk by Jeroen Baten in Main Track (55 minutes)

I run the LibrePlan project. My biggest user is an oil company with offices in 30 countries. LibrePlan is a web-based project management application with very professional features. I have been managing this project for the past 5 years. In this talk I want to show you what LibrePlan is, why it’s so cool and how I kept the project alive. It is a talk about tech stuff, but also about moral dilemma’s. It’s a talk for newbies, but also for those with lots of open source development experience.

0
The Hack and the Hacker
Talk by InfoSec Hoppers, Saskia Coplans, Catherine Chapman in FlawCon Track (50 minutes)

“Major security flaw in virtual reality porn app SinVR exposes the perverted secrets of 20,000 users.” This was the headline which ran in The Daily Mail after Digital Interruption discovered a security vulnerability in a virtual reality porn application in January 2018. But the headline didn’t tell the true story. The media attention, although brief, got more ridiculous by the day. It quickly became clear that sex, not security, was why the press was interested in this story. When it comes to vulnerability disclosure, with no mandatory process researchers often get stuck. If they can’t engage with the vendor directly, they are forced to either sit on the vuln, fully disclose (typically via 280 characters), or turn to the media for help. In a media climate that changes narratives and sensationalises stories for clicks and follows how does this translate for security. How do we instil trust in our industry when stories are twisted and there is little recourse for the researcher, especially when they know the law does not protect them? This talk will discuss how the media use narratives to twist stories and the impact this has on security. We will discuss real cases with real outcomes and look at how communication and trust between InfoSec and the press might be improved.

12:30
0
Lunch in Main Track (55 minutes)

Taking a break on the main stage, but food isn't provided so you need to find it yourselves

0
Lunch in FlawCon Track (1 hour)

Taking a break on the main stage, but food isn't provided so you need to find it yourselves

13:30
0
Lightning Talks in Main Track (25 minutes)

Five talk slots, five minutes per talk. Slots are first-come, first-served!

0
Lightning Talks in FlawCon Track (30 minutes)

Five talk slots, five minutes per talk. Slots are first-come, first-served!

14:00
0
Linux Outlaws: Last Time Around
Talk by Dan Lynch, Fabian Scherschel in Main Track (55 minutes)

It’s been 5 years since Dan & Fab hung up their microphones and ended the popular Linux Outlaws podcast. Since then a lot has happened in the Free & Open Source world. Join our duo as they reunite for a one-off live show. They’ll be recapping what’s happened since the end of LO, discussing the big stories in the FOSS world right now, and speculating what might be coming down the pipeline in the future.

15:00
0
Lets map the world, Missing Maps and Openstreetmap
Talk by Stuart Ward in Main Track (25 minutes)

We all know Wikipedia, well there is a similar project for maps, OpenStreetMap. Currently most of the western nations have good coverage on both OpenStreetMap and other maps, but when we go to the poorer and underdeveloped parts of the world there are no maps. Not on detailed scale that is actually useful. The Missing Maps project has set itself the target of getting the these parts of the world mapped. And we in the west can directly help with this, by helping to create the base maps that local people then add to and correct. By creating open map data we are making the world accessible In the talk I will show how you can directly help, and what open source technologies are doing to create the worlds open mapping resource.

0
That time I made around £1500 for hacking a Thomas the tank engine application
Talk by Jay Harris in FlawCon Track (25 minutes)

In January 2018, I hacked a Thomas the tank engine application as part of a bug bounty (awarded $1750 for two bugs). This talk will discuss the process of finding the vulns and details of the security flaws that were submitted to the organisation. Is there a way to hack legally and getting paid for it? Well there are professions such as penetration testing but this has two major downsides - 1) dealing with clients can be messy and 2) it’s not always fun being told what to hack. Bug bounties offer an alternative, with some people making millions by doing what they love - hacking things. In this talk, we’ll discuss what bug bounties are and why they can be the perfect way to practice hacking in a safe and legal way. We’ll be discussing the vulnerabilities I found in a Thomas the tank engine android application that allowed me to take over accounts, looking at how the weaknesses were discovered and the way they could be exploited by an attacker.

15:30
0
The IndieWeb Movement: Owning Your Data and Being the Change You Want to See in the Web
Talk by Jamie Tanna in Main Track (25 minutes)

In today’s age of the Web, we’ve resigned ourselves to using social Silos, such as Twitter, Facebook or Medium. Content we create on their platforms is owned by them, free for them to profit off it, and we can’t move off the platforms because then all our followers would need to use a new platform. The IndieWeb is all about taking the control of where we post, and how. As citizens of the Web we deserve to own the content and data we so lovingly produce, so why don’t we do it? Why don’t we use our websites as our social hub, publishing on our own site, and then syndicating everywhere else? If there’s something that you want a Silo to do, why not build it yourself? If we build our own platforms, we can decide how they work and interoperate. By selfdogfooding we can use our own projects to help drive the functionality we want, being the change we want to see in the world. We’ll talk about the underlying open standards and Open Source components that are driving the ease of adoption across it, such as Microformats2, Webmention, Micropub and Microsub, and IndieAuth, to name but a few! This is truly about creating the Social Web, providing an RSS-feed like experience to follow all your friends, colleagues, and people of interest, but being able to interact in-feed, as you would on i.e. Twitter. You can add inline comments, like, or reshare the content for those following your own site. And of course, it’s all about enabling everyone to get involved - feedback from not-as-technical folks, through to multiple implementations of the same tools are actively encouraged. But don’t even get me started on the Fediverse (i.e. Mastodon) - which would be a whole talk in itself.

16:00
0
Rafflecast in Main Track (25 minutes)

This is our often hilarious closing session where we draw the raffle as a form of entertainment and record it. We can't remember why either, it's a tradition.